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To read or not to read: Is Shakespeare just too complicated?

18 Jul

 

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come:
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
   If this be error and upon me proved,
   I never writ, nor no man ever loved

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I heart youtube! My top 5 videos.

17 Jul

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I know blogging about youtube is probably considered very old-fashioned, considering it has been around for like forever, but I am currently having a laptop clear out and just realised that I have over 100 youtube videos saved in my favourites! As I’m blogging from a laptop that I use mainly for planning my lessons, most of these are resources I’ve used in the classroom. Unfortunately, I have to hand said laptop back and thus have to delete all my favourites. In honor of this,  here are 5 videos that have made my teaching life so much easier!!

1.  Let Him Have It, Part 6. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xn3kMob2lqQ&feature=related

This is one of my favourite films ever. I originally watched it to help with a lesson but it really endeared itself to me. It is such a tragic tale that really gets you thinking. I have used lots of times to discuss the death penalty and it’s provoked some pretty fierce debate! Also shows how the english language can be misinterpreted in different ways.

2.  Onomotopeia. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q-BVwwKTjlI

A cute little video to help onomatopoeia stay in pupils heads.

3. A disturbing and disgusting take on the original Sandman story. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjgHbRrnjhU

This cartoon  (the sandman is pictured above) is very engaging and definitely for older pupils (unless you want to give the younger one nightmares!) Great for discussing genre, textual interpretations and I imagine it could lead to some fantastic creative writing.

4. Skydiving. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OW6VDOd-zKk

Man decides to film himself jumping out of a plane. Cue an utterly engaging video that pupils love. Fantastic way to discuss the senses and can lead to a piece of descriptive writing.

5. Last but not least: Dragon’s Den http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzcQtXA5Gc8

I absolutely love this show. I think it’s amazing. It’s also great for looking at how to deliver a persuasive speech. There are also some very funny ones on how not to deliver one too!

That’s it, until tomorrow where as usually I’ll present my Sunday sonnet! Happy watching!

SATS and another sunday sonnet!

11 Jul

I am sorry I have not blogged for a week or so. On a positive note, I got the job! This is my third time that I have used that poem for an interview so it worked a charm eventually!! I am really excited about the new job and very much wanting to wind down with 2 weeks (10 days!) until the holidays!!!

Anyway with year 7 parent’s evening looming and with some angelic year 6’s making their way to my school last week for ‘induction’, I am blogging about SATS. Now as a relatively new teacher my experience with y9 SATS was pretty limited anyway (they ended a year after I started teaching). I do not know much about them except that some year 7 pupils I teach seem to  not be working anywhere near the SATS level they recieved at the end of primary school. Thus making me seem a bad teacher, them seem like a bad pupil and their parents gasping in belief when their pupils are labelled by the school as ‘regressing!’ From my primary trained friends it seems that the intensive teaching in year 6 that goes on means that pupils end up with a highly inflated level that reflects fantastically on their primary school, but not so when they can’t achieve it in secondary school. Anyone got any thoughts on this??

Moving on to my sunday sonnet, which I appear to be making a tradition (if only for the alliteration in the title)

Shall I compare thee to a Summer’s day?
Thou art more lovely and more temperate:
Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,
And Summer’s lease hath all too short a date:
Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,
And oft’ is his gold complexion dimm’d;
And every fair from fair sometime declines,
By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d:
But thy eternal Summer shall not fade
Nor lose possession of that fair thou owest;
Nor shall Death brag thou wanderest in his shade,
When in eternal lines to time thou growest:

So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,
So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

Thought this would be apt given the fact it’s about 30 degrees in my appartment at present!!!